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Cremation FAQ's

1. Does a body have to be embalmed before cremation?
 
2. Is it necessary to use a casket for cremation?
 
3. Exactly what happens at the crematory? Can a family member or clergy be present at the cremation?
 
4. What do cremated remains that are returned to the family look like?
 
5. Is the deceased cremated unclothed?
 
6. What happens if I want to be cremated when I die, but a family member is opposed to this choice?
 
7. I'm not certain what should be done with my cremated remains. What are my choices?
 
8. I understand that more and more people are choosing cremation. Is this because the cost is lower?
 

Question #1Does a body have to be embalmed before cremation?
Answer:Embalming is not required by law. However, if there is to be a public viewing or if the body is taken into a church, embalming may be necessary.

Question #2Is it necessary to use a casket for cremation?
Answer:No, state and local laws do not require a casket for cremation. However, most crematories do require the body to be placed in some type of container to encase the body.

Question #3Exactly what happens at the crematory? Can a family member or clergy be present at the cremation?
Answer:The deceased is placed in a combustible box and then placed in the cremation chamber. Depending upon the crematory, family or clergy may be present at the initiation of the cremation process. After the body is placed in the chamber intense heat (about 1500 degrees) is used to reduce the body to bone fragments. These bone fragments also consist of a minimal amount of ash from the box. These are pulverized to a uniform consistency and placed in the desired container. Family or clergy can choose to receive the cremated remains at the crematory or we will deliver the cremains to a church or directly to the family.

Question #4What do cremated remains that are returned to the family look like?
Answer:The quantity of cremated remains of an adult is returned in a box that measures 4 ½ x 7 x 9 inches. Since it consists mostly of bone fragments, it is fairly heavy, approximately 7-8 pounds. Because of pulverizing, the appearance is somewhat like that of crushed seashells. We, therefore, discourage the use of the term "ashes" and instead use the term "cremated remains." Unless an urn is purchased, the cremated remains are returned in a plain temporary container.

Question #5Is the deceased cremated unclothed?
Answer:The deceased may be clothed as desired by the family. A military uniform, scholastic robe or other special garment may be cremated. Often the special clothing is neatly folded and cremated with the deceased.

Question #6What happens if I want to be cremated when I die, but a family member is opposed to this choice?
Answer:It is always best if an agreement can be reached that the family will respect the wishes of the person who chooses cremation, and will abide by that agreement after the death occurs. Discussion with a cremation counselor, funeral director, clergy, chaplain or other advisor may help with this decision. If an agreement cannot be reached before the death occurs, the person choosing cremation may decide to make plans for cremation despite the opposition. In this case, he should ensure that he specifies the desire for cremation and that these plans are on file, preferably prepaid with the cremation provider.

Question #7I'm not certain what should be done with my cremated remains. What are my choices?
Answer:One possibility is to request that the cremated remains be returned to the nearest of kin, so that a decision about their disposition can be made later. Cremated remains can be buried in a cemetery plot or placed in a mausoleum or columbarium. If the cemetery is far from the place of death, the cremation provider can send the remains by registered mail. Some churches have a columbarium or memorial garden where cremated remains can be placed; this is usually limited to church members and their families. Family members can also bury cremated remains on their own private property, depending on local ordinances. Scattering of cremated remains is an increasingly popular choice.

Question #8I understand that more and more people are choosing cremation. Is this because the cost is lower?
Answer:While it is true that the cost of cremation is about 20% to 24% that of body burial, many people are choosing and planning cremation because of other factors. These include the simplicity and dignity of cremation services, environmental concerns, and the flexibility cremation offers in ceremony planning and in the disposition of the remains.

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(315) 823-2424 Email: info@eneafamily.com